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09/13/2014

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Lucia Figueroa

You did a great job with this interpretation. I live in Uruguay but I don't know how to play truco, knowing that this lyric has this second meaning behind makes it even better.
"En el naipe del vivir,
 para ganar, primero perdi" what a creative way to exalt experience.

Michael

Thanks, Lucia! I always enjoy your comments. Tango siempre, Michael

Michael

PS: Lucia, check back here tomorrow for two good Uruguayan tango stories!

Lucia Figueroa

Hey, thanks I've started to check everyday :) I'm learning a lot.

My boyfriend and I were so engaged by this interpretation that he taught me how to play truco!

Also, checking the wikipedia article for the spanish cards (http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baraja_espa%C3%B1ola), I got linked to this image: http://www.altacarta.com/overview/aluette.html and look the inscription of the ace "ouvrir la bouche" => "abrir la boca", so the ace is "la carta de la boca".

I commented this to my boyfriend and he commented me that, on the Argentinian variation of truco the highest values on the game are the aces, so, it could made sense that having the "card of the mouth" equals to have good luck.

(I'm happy to add yet another interpretation).

Michael

Interesting, Lucia! But the cards shown at the link you gave are cards for Aluette, not truco. Truco is played with Cartas Espagnolas, which are different from those. How does that figure in?

Lucia Figueroa

You are right, I forgot to mention, if you go the aluette entry: http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aluette you will see that the aluette is the french version of truco.

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